How safe is your digital cash? Find out

Internet security experts warn caution as the world takes the cashless route. The globe’s shift towards becoming a digital economy, like any major world event, is a big opportunity for cyber criminals to find vulnerabilities.

Shadma Shaikh 55803712.png& Payal Ganguly spoke with security experts to find what risks are involved in the transition to a cashless India. The following are some ways the security of your transactions could be compromised:

CARD TRANSACTIONS

Point-of-Sale (POS) Machines
– Unauthorized POS devices can copy the details of credit and debit cards while swiping them in the machines
– Compromised devices can replicate cards
– The internet network that PoS devices use can be hacked to get details

ATMS
– Hackers can use malware-infected debit and credit cards to take control of an ATM network, causing the ATM to spit out cash
– Installation of fake micro ATMs can be used to capture card details for use later
– Crooks can take advantage of first-time ATM users under the pretext of helping them transact at ATMs

ONLINE TRANSACTIONS

Marketplace transactions
– Saving card details on marketplaces can expose customer info in case of a breach
– Cyber-attacks on marketplaces can give hackers access to customers’ personal info as well as details such as on merchant and vendor payments

Digital wallets
– Online wallets are easy targets for attackers. Since wallet transactions are of smaller amounts, many wallets do not use very advanced security measures, making them vulnerable to attacks
– Many wallet apps keep their users signed in on their wallet accounts, leaving just a single layer of authorization for a hacker to get through
SECURE YOUR TRANSACTIONS

Online transactions
– Avoid saving card data online
– Pay online using OTPs
– Before entering details on any website, ensure it is a secure link. Web address should begin with ‘https’
– Avoid using personal info such as birth date/names for passwords
– Avoid using card-on-delivery option with new online retailers. It is safer to use digital wallets for payment at delivery

Mobile security
– Use password manager apps that generate random passwords
– Do not use the same password for digital wallets and netbanking
– Log out of digital wallets once a transaction is completed
– Avoid installing third-party apps on your phone that pop up during ads
– Activate mobile tracking to wipe out data remotely in case of device theft

Source: The Economic Times

 

Assassination of John F. Kennedy

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th JFK_limousine.pngPresident of the United States, was assassinated at 12:30 p.m. Central Standard Time (18:30 UTC) on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dealey Plaza, Dallas, Texas. Fatally shot by Lee Harvey Oswald, Kennedy was traveling with his wife, Jacqueline, Texas Governor John Connally, and Connally’s wife, Nellie, in a presidential motorcade. A ten-month investigation from November 1963 to September 1964 by the Warren Commission concluded that Oswald acted alone in shooting Kennedy, and that Jack Ruby also acted alone when he killed Oswald before he could stand trial. Kennedy’s death marked the fourth (following Lincoln, Garfield, and McKinley) and most recent assassination of an American President. Vice President Lyndon B. Johnsonbecame President upon Kennedy’s death, taking the constitutionally prescribed oath of office onboard Air Force One at Dallas Love Field before departing for Washington, D.C.

In contrast to the conclusions of the Warren Commission, the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA) concluded in 1979 that Kennedy was “probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy”. The HSCA agreed with the Warren Commission that the injuries sustained by Kennedy and Connally were caused by Oswald’s three rifle shots, but they also determined the existence of additional gunshots based on analysis of an audio recording and therefore “… a high probability that two gunmen fired at [the] President.” The Committee was not able to identify any individuals or groups involved with the conspiracy. In addition, the HSCA found that the original federal investigations were “seriously flawed” in respect of information-sharing and the possibility of conspiracy. As recommended by the HSCA, the acoustic evidence indicating conspiracy was subsequently re-examined and rejected.

In light of the investigative reports determining that “reliable acoustic data do not support a conclusion that there was a second gunman,” the Justice Department has concluded active investigations, stating “that no persuasive evidence can be identified to support the theory of a conspiracy in … the assassination of President Kennedy.”However, Kennedy’s assassination is still the subject of widespread debate and has spawned numerous conspiracy theories and alternative scenarios. Polling in 2013 showed that 60% of Americans believe that a group of conspirators was responsible for the assassination.

Source: Wikipedia

Silk Road – The online black market

Silk Road was an online black market and the Silk_Road_Marketplace_Item_Screen.jpgfirst modern darknet market, best known as a platform for selling illegal drugs. As part of the dark web, it was operated as a Tor hidden service, such that online users were able to browse it anonymously and securely without potential traffic monitoring. The website was launched in February 2011; development had begun six months prior. Initially there were a limited number of new seller accounts available; new sellers had to purchase an account in an auction. Later, a fixed fee was charged for each new seller account.

In October 2013, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) shut down the website and arrested Ross William Ulbricht under charges of being the site’s pseudonymous founder “Dread Pirate Roberts”. On 6 November 2013, Silk Road 2.0 came online, run by former administrators of Silk Road. It too was shut down and the alleged operator was arrested on 6 November 2014 as part of the so-called “Operation Onymous”.

Ulbricht was convicted of seven charges related to Silk Road in U.S. Federal Court in Manhattan and was sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole. Further charges alleging murder-for-hire remain pending in Maryland.

Ross Ulbricht was alleged by the FBI to be the founder and owner of Silk Road and the person behind the pseudonym “Dread Pirate Roberts”. He was arrested on 2 October 2013 in San Francisco at 3:15 p.m. PST in Glen ParkLibrary, a branch of the San Francisco Public Library.[35]

Ulbricht was indicted on charges of money laundering, computer hacking, conspiracy to traffic narcotics,and attempting to have six people killed. Prosecutors alleged that Ulbricht paid $730,000 to others to commit the murders, although none of the murders actually occurred. Ulbricht ultimately was not prosecuted for any of the alleged murder attempts.

The FBI initially seized 26,000 bitcoins from accounts on Silk Road, worth approximately $3.6 million at the time. An FBI spokesperson said that the agency would hold the bitcoins until Ulbricht’s trial finished, after which the bitcoins would be liquidated. In October 2013, the FBI reported that it had seized 144,000 bitcoins, worth $28.5 million, and that the bitcoins belonged to Ulbricht. On 27 June 2014, the U.S. Marshals Service sold 29,657 bitcoins in 10 blocks in an online auction, estimated to be worth $18 million at current rates and only about a quarter of the seized bitcoins. Another 144,342 bitcoins were kept which had been found on Ulbricht’s computer, roughly $87 million. Tim Draper bought the bitcoins at the auction with an estimated worth of $17 million, to lend them to a bitcoin start-up called Vaurum which is working in developing economies of emerging markets.

Source: Wikipedia

Jack the Ripper

 

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1888 was a bad year to be a prostitute. Between August 7 and November 10 of that year, five women were killed in the Whitechapel district of London’s East End, their throats slashed and their bodies mutilated in a way that indicated they all met their fates at the hands of the same person. One victim’s kidney was even mailed to the police, along with a series of taunting notes penned by someone calling himself Jack the Ripper. Serial murder was a relatively new phenomenon and the attacks were highly publicized. The law’s failure to identify the killer led to such an outcry that both the home secretary and London police commissioner resigned in disgrace.

Jack the Ripper, whoever he was, has been the subject of hundreds of books and articles. The theories surrounding his identity vary from a covert Masonic plot to a member of the royal family. Here are the most likely suspects:

Montague Druitt, a barrister with knowledge of human anatomy. Rumored to be insane, he disappeared after the last murder; his body was later found floating in the River Thames.

George Chapman, a barber who lived in Whitechapel during the time of the murders and who was later found guilty of poisoning three of his wives.

Aaron Kosminski, a Whitechapel resident known for his affinity for prostitutes. He was hospitalized in an asylum several months after the last murder.

 

 

Source: http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1867198_1867170_1867220,00.html